Weekend at Chautauqua Greenville SC

Posted by Sally Potosky
on May 24, 2013.

I got to thinking about that article on Greenville in the Boston Globe and wondered what it would sound like during a Chautauqua Weekend. It not only sounded like a great weekend vacation, but we have two of them coming up, real soon! If you have weekend guest then, you won’t lack for things to do!

WEEKEND ONE:  June 14-16, 2013

FRIDAY

3 p.m.  Welcome:  Start your visit with a Tour of Greenville (walk, bike, drive, or book a Segway tour!), or visit the Upcountry History Museum, or just stroll down Main Street and visit Falls Park with its our now famous Liberty Bridge. For more info: visitgreenvillesc.com

5 p.m.  Dining In or Out:  Have an early dinner at one of Greenville’s dining experiences. Or pick up a picnic dinner to enjoy outdoors at the show.

7:30 p.m. Davy Crockett Show  Enjoy the summer evening under the Chautauqua Tent at Greenville Technical College. (FREE)  After the show, join the performers in the pub at the Phoenix Inn, 246 N Pleasantburg Dr

SATURDAY

9 a.m.  Discussion with the Performer:  Grab a cup of coffee and meet Larry bounds, who portrayed Davy Crockett the night before. Phoenix Inn  (FREE)  Stay for a late breakfast there or enjoy some free time before heading to the next show.

Noon  Lunch:  Have lunch downtown, or head to the Handlebar and grab lunch and a parking space there, before the show.  304 E Stone Ave, Greenville 29609

2 p.m.  Malcolm X Show: at The Handlebar (FREE)

5 p.m.  Dining In or Out:  Have an early dinner or bring a picnic to enjoy outdoors at the show.

7:30 p.m.  Susan B. Anthony Show  Under the Chautauqua Tent at Greenville Technical College.  (FREE)  After the show, join the performers in the pub at The Phoenix Inn 246 N Pleasantburg Dr.

SUNDAY

9 a.m.  Relax. Sleep in or stroll Main Street without the crowds. Look for the Mice on Main or follow the Art in Public Places walk

12:30 p.m.  Luncheon with the Chautauqua Stars at The Phoenix inn  (Tickets $30 before June 1, $35 after. Order Tickets Here  

2:00 p.m.  Do something different: Take the trolley to a museum at Heritage Green (Art Museum, Bob Jones Gallery, Children’s Museum, Upcountry History), or just ride the whole trolley route for a street side view of downtown Greenville). Here’s the trolley map

5 p.m.  Dining In or Out:  Have an early dinner or bring a picnic to enjoy outdoors at the show.

7:30 p.m.  Herman Melville Show: Under the Chautauqua Tent at Greenville Technical College. (FREE) After the show, join the performers in the pub at the Phoenix Inn

WEEKEND TWO:  June 21-23, 2013

FRIDAY

11:30 am  Herman Melville Show:  Start your visit with Melville as he tells his side of the story at the Fountain Inn Center for the Performing Arts, 315 N Main St Fountain Inn 29644 MAP

12:30  Lunch:  Stay for lunch in Fountain Inn. For lunch suggestions

3 p.m.  Continue your visit with a Tour of Greenville (walk, bike, drive, or book a Segway tour!), or visit the Upcountry History Museum, or just stroll down Main Street. For Walking Tours  For more info: visitgreenvillesc.com

5 p.m.  Dining In or Out:  Have an early dinner or bring a picnic to enjoy outdoors at the show.

7:30 p.m. Legends of Camelot  In Falls Park under the summer sky. Bring your lawn chairs. 601 S Main St Greenville (FREE)   Note: Rainsite at Greenville Tech. After the show, check out the nightlfe in downtown Greenville.

SATURDAY

9 a.m.  Discussion with the Performer: Grab a cup of coffee and meet Ken Johnston, who portrayed King Harold, who recounted the Legends of Camelot the night before.  Phoenix Inn  (FREE)

11 a.m,  Main St. meander:  Have lunch downtown, or head to the Handlebar and grab lunch and a parking space there, before the show. 304 E Stone Ave, Greenville 29609

2 p.m.  Susan B. Anthony Show: The Handlebar (FREE)

5 p.m.  Dining In or Out:  Have an early dinner or pick up a picnic dinner to enjoy outdoors at the show.

7:30 p.m.  Malcolm X Show   Under the Chautauqua Tent at Greenville Technical College. (FREE) After the show, join the performers in the pub at the Phoenix Inn, 246 N Pleasantburg Dr

SUNDAY

9 a.m.  Relax. Sleep in or stroll Main Street without the crowds.Look for the Mice on Main or follow the Art in Public Places walk

noon Sunday Brunch, a Greenville tradition

2:00 p.m. Do something different: Take the trolley to a museum at Heritage Green (Art Museum, Bob Jones Gallery, Children’s Museum, Upcountry History), or just ride the whole trolley route for a streetside view of downtown Greenville)

5 p.m.  Dining In or Out:  Have an early dinner or bring a picnic to enjoy outdoors at the show.

7:30 p.m.  Davy Crockett Show: Under the Chautauqua Tent at Greenville Technical College. (FREE) After the show, join the performers in the pub at the Phoenix Inn.

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Malcolm X’s Family

Posted by Caroline McIntyre
on May 16, 2013.

No matter how politically important a historical figure, the Chautauqua audience always wants to know the personal side – family. Among all the great political questions asked at the May 14th Malcolm X discussion, the “aha moment” was – how does a 31 year old mother of six children under the age of 7 survive the firebombing of her home and the murder of their father?  (Betty was pregnant with the twins during the time of the assassination.)

As usual the Chautauqua audience had contributions. Donald Sweeper recommended reading “Growing Up-X:  A Memoir by the Daughter of Malcolm X.” Larry Bounds conjectured, “I bet Darrick Johnson will know when he performs as Malcolm X for us this June.”

Friends and supporters helped Betty and her daughters survive immediately after the assassination. “The Autobiography of Malcolm X” was published that fall, and the family received half of the profits. Betty pulled herself and her family together and went on to earn her doctorate and became a university professor/administrator and nationally known speaker.

The question of what happened to Malcolm’s family turns out to be timely. Growing up in family of a “Legend” can be difficult. Last Thursday (May 9, 2013) his grandson Malcolm was murdered in Mexico over a disputed bar bill. The early reports indicate this was not politically motivated. When we contacted Darrick Johnson (our June presenter for Malcolm X) for details, here was his response:

“Yes, I was aware of this, but also defiantly shocked, when I came across it last Friday on line. I saw nothing on the national news. I’m friends on Facebook with one of his aunts on whose page I expressed my condolences. It was mentioned that the family is asking for privacy and will make a statement at a latter date.

I meet this young man in 2009 as I was just leaving the ballroom named after his grandparents in NY. I was still taking in all the emotions of having just performed a tribute on the same stage where my hero once stood, when I was approached by a young man.  I just assumed he was simply commenting on my likeness to Malcolm X, when he said, ‘Wow. I feel as if I just met my grandfather for the first time.’ We embraced and have followed each other on Facebook.” (Malcolm’s grandson was born 20 years after the assassination.)

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Malcolm X’s Eulogy – The Seed

Posted by Caroline McIntyre
on May 8, 2013.

Just months after the his assassination “The Autobiography of Malcolm X” was published. His ghost writer/collaborator Alex Haley wrote in the epilogue:

“I tried to be a dispassionate chronicler. But he was the most electric personality I have every met, and I still can’t quite conceive him dead. It feels to me as if he has just gone into some next chapter, to be written by historians.”

His life and this book have taken their place in history. Here’s what was said of him at the time of his passing.

MALCOLM X’S EULOGY, delivered by Ossie Davis
Faith Temple Church Of God
 February 27,1965

“Here – at this final hour, in this quiet place – Harlem has come to bid farewell to one of its brightest hopes – extinguished now, and gone from us forever. For Harlem is where he worked and where he struggled and fought – his home of homes, where his heart was, and where his people are – and it is, therefore, most fitting that we meet once again – in Harlem – to share these last moments with him. For Harlem has ever been gracious to those who have loved her, have fought her, and have defended her honor even to the death.

It is not in the memory of man that this beleaguered, unfortunate, but nonetheless proud community has found a braver, more gallant young champion than this Afro-American who lies before us – unconquered still. I say the word again, as he would want me to: Afro-American – Afro-American Malcolm, who was a master, was most meticulous in his use of words. Nobody knew better than he the power words have over minds of men. Malcolm had stopped being a ‘Negro’ years ago. It had become too small, too puny, too weak a word for him. Malcolm was bigger than that. Malcolm had become an Afro-American and he wanted – so desperately – that we, that all his people, would become Afro-Americans too.

There are those who will consider it their duty, as friends of the Negro people, to tell us to revile him, to flee, even from the presence of his memory, to save ourselves by writing him out of the history of our turbulent times. Many will ask what Harlem finds to honor in this stormy, controversial and bold young captain – and we will smile. Many will say turn away – away from this man, for he is not a man but a demon, a monster, a subverter and an enemy of the black man – and we will smile. They will say that he is of hate – a fanatic, a racist – who can only bring evil to the cause for which you struggle! And we will answer and say to them : Did you ever talk to Brother Malcolm? Did you ever touch him, or have him smile at you? Did you ever really listen to him? Did he ever do a mean thing? Was he ever himself associated with violence or any public disturbance? For if you did you would know him. And if you knew him you would know why we must honor him.

Malcolm was our manhood, our living, black manhood! This was his meaning to his people. And, in honoring him, we honor the best in ourselves. Last year, from Africa, he wrote these words to a friend: ‘My journey’, he says, ‘is almost ended, and I have a much broader scope than when I started out, which I believe will add new life and dimension to our struggle for freedom and honor and dignity in the States. I am writing these things so that you will know for a fact the tremendous sympathy and support we have among the African States for our Human Rights struggle. The main thing is that we keep a United Front wherein our most valuable time and energy will not be wasted fighting each other.’ However we may have differed with him – or with each other about him and his value as a man – let his going from us serve only to bring us together, now.

Consigning these mortal remains to earth, the common mother of all, secure in the knowledge that what we place in the ground is no more now a man – but a seed – which, after the winter of our discontent, will come forth again to meet us. And we will know him then for what he was and is – a Prince – our own black shining Prince! – who didn’t hesitate to die, because he loved us so.”

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